Vicente Mollestad’s
artistic practice develops within an around
the West’s relationship to the non-Western.

Often through connecting phenomenas, ideas and references that were, in some way or another, lost or overlooked. Throughout the body of work there is a recurring interest in the problematics of the seemingly inseperable relationship between the personal and intimate to the political and historical.

Among recent projects is the making of an archive of lesser known European cannibal exploitation film, investigating and questioning cannibalism as anti-colonial strategy, and looking into the role of globale immigration and world politics in relation to the Norwegian rap scene from the 80’s up until present time. 


Vicente is currently based in La Paz, Bolivia.

This website is under construction.



Recent/Upcoming:
  1. Spriten Kunsthall 28.01.22
      The Current is Strong and
      Un-Western

  2. Telemark Kunstsenter 24.02.22
       I Wish You Would Call Me More Often

   3. Greenlight District 17.11.21
       The Cannibal Archive:
       Green Inferno












Mark

4. Loren Eiseley





LE / 1957
From The Immense Journey

            A billion years have gone into the making of that eye; the water and the salt and the vapors of the sun have built it; things that squirmed in the tide silts have devised it. Light-year beyond light-year, deep beyond deep, the mind may rove by means of it, hanging above the bottomless and surveying impartially the state of matter in the white-dwarf suns.




Yet whenever I see a frog’s eye low in the water warily ogling the shoreward landscape, I always think inconsequentially of those twiddling mechanical eyes that mankind manipulates nightly from a thousand observatories. Someday, with a telescopic lens an acre in extent, we are going to see something not to out liking, some looming shape outside there across the great pond of space.
            Whenever I catch a frog’s eye I am aware of this, but I do not find it depressing. I stand quite still and try hard not to move or lift a hand since it would only frighten him. And standing thus it finally comes to me that this is the most enormous extension of vision of which life is capable: the projection of itself into other lives. This is the lonely magnificent power of humanity. It is, far more than any spatial adventure, the supreme epitome of the reaching out.
Mark