“My artistic practice develops within and around the relationship between the west and the un-western, an intimate as well as a historical relation that lead to my involuntary migration from Bolivia.

In my work I’m particularly interested in how coloniality lives and sets the premise for the development of globalism, capitalism, immigration. 
 
Working with contemporary art in Bolivia calls for an experimental approach to how to practice and there is an aspect of necessary adaptability and resistance in exploring different disciplines as well as audience and form. This has lead my practice to include installation, painting, sound, video, text production, activism and performance, and I’m continuously questioning what I consider a part of my practice, who the practice is for and where it is shown.

It is reoccurring themes and interests that bind the various production together as the works circles the seemingly inseparable relationship between the personal and intimate to the political and historical.

Among recent projects is an investigation of the phenomena that was European cannibal films from the 70s-80s and looking into how global immigration and world politics shaped and continues to shape Norwegian rap scene.
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Recent/Upcoming Exhibitions/events:

   1. TBA
       
Brown Tears, Brown Sweat and Brown Blood.

   2. Spriten Kunsthall 28.01.22
       The Current is Strong and Un-Western.

    3.Telemark Kunstsenter 24.02.22
       I Wish You Would Call Me More Often.


List of links:

Portfolio+CV 
Instagram
Soundcloud
E-mail
 
















Mark

3. Thomas Kuhn

 




TK / 1962
From The Structure of Scientific Revolutions

            Yet one standard product of the scientific enterprise is missing. Normal science does not aim at novelties of fact or theory and, when successful, finds none. New and unsuspected phenomena are, however, repeatedly uncovered by scientific research, and radical new theories have again and again been invented by scientists.
            The practice of normal science depends on the ability, acquired from exemplars, to group objects and situations into similarity sets which are primitive in the sense that the grouping is done without an answer to the question, “Similar with respect to what?” One central aspect of any revolution is, then, that some of the similarity relations change. Objects that were grouped in the same set before are grouped in different ones afterward and vice versa. Think of the sun, moon, Mars, and earth before and after Copernicus; of free fall, pendular, and planetary motion before and after Galileo; or of salts, alloys, and a sulpuhur-iron filing mix before and after Dalton.





Mark